David Rodgers

David Rodgers profile image

Player Information

Position
Centre-back
D.O.B.
28 February 1952

Born: Bristol
Signed from: Apprentice, 1969
Position: Centre back
Seasons played: 1970-82
Appearances: 235

David grew up with Bristol City in his blood, being the son of centre-forward Arnold Rodgers, who served the club with distinction in the 1950s, having moved down from Huddersfield Town, and was top scorer for four successive seasons.

Unlike his father, the younger Rodgers played at the back from an early age, earning England Schoolboy honours and attracting City scouts. After signing his first professional contract at Ashton Gate in July 1969, David made his first team debut the following year, scoring the opening goal in a 2-1 League Cup fourth round replay against Leicester City at Ashton Gate.

His height and powerful physique, allied to a willingness to put his head in where others might have feared to put a foot, made him a potent threat in the opposition penalty area when moving forward for set-pieces, as well as a dominant force in his own box.

David’s best seasons came after City won promotion to the First Division, partnering either Norman Hunter or Geoff Merrick in central defence. He scored six goals in the 1978- 79 season and followed up with the same number in the following campaign.

An old-fashioned centre-half, who relished aerial duels with big centre-forwards, David proved himself a good enough all-round footballer to establish himself as a first team regular at the height of City’s Glory Years, playing against strikers of the calibre of Kenny Dalglish, Peter Osgood, Joe Jordan and Paul Mariner.

Supporters enjoyed the effort, commitment and fearlessness of a player always prepared to show 100 per cent commitment to the team. Tough, but fair in the tackle, David often left the pitch bearing the scars of battle.

When his playing days at Ashton Gate ended, he moved to Torquay United and Lincoln City for short spells before dropping into non-League football with Forest Green Rovers.